Guitar Star

This is the place to discuss music-related topics by "other artists". No Gordon Giltrap connections needed. Who have you seen? Who do you like? Who should we know about?

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Sue
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Re: Guitar Star

Postby Sue » Thu Jul 30, 2015 10:44 pm

:shock: :lol: :roll:

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Bob Wilson
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Re: Guitar Star

Postby Bob Wilson » Fri Jul 31, 2015 7:43 am

Glad you see them now :)
If you ever get to see 4 Parts Guitar (which I heartily recommend) ask John Etheridge to tell you about Hendrix and Clapton when they came to see him play many moons ago. I won't spoil it by telling Johns story but Jimis comments to John and then Erics speak volumes about the people :) all three heroes of mine but all totally different characters. :)
Lives touch and paths cross for a reason - be grateful for these meetings and grow as a person

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Re: Guitar Star

Postby kevin » Fri Jul 31, 2015 7:43 pm

Thanks on my to see list!

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Re: Guitar Star

Postby BRC » Sun Aug 02, 2015 11:02 am

Kevin et al,

Before I write anything I have to confess that I have skipped through the episodes prior to the final as time has been very tight with other events - both planned and unplanned. However, I did watch the final in full and, on balance, believe that the three who made it there were the best of the 'contestants' that were shown.

Each of the finalists gave a superb performance within their category (or should that be 'genre') and deserved the accolades from the judges. Did I share the judges opinion? I did to an extent, though wasn't totally sure what they were looking/listening for in the individuals. I was looking/listening for someone who made the guitar 'talk' to me in a way that it was comfortable for me to listen to and also want to hear more. Added to that was the need for the performer to engage my interest by playing to the audience, not at the audience.

Weighing up my own criteria the choice was between Gary and Liam. Was Gary someone I could listen to with his percussive style, or was Liam's mastery of the classical guitar (despite not picking with his fingernails) sufficient to engage me for a whole album?

I have to be totally honest and say that after a couple of tracks of Gary's playing I would definitely want a change of style to give my ears and brain a rest. I do not detract at all, in saying that, from the high level of skill in his playing - just not something I would willingly listen to in big chunks.

I really liked Liam's style and warmed to his easy going manner allied to his obvious guitar skills. I would have chosen Liam as the winner although I question whether his style fitted well with the overall concept of the show. The reason I say that is that there seemed a heavier leaning towards showmanship than actual guitar virtuosity. Just my opinion - to be fair Huey Morgan, I think, said in an earlier programme there seemed to be "more style than substance" with some of the performers. I felt that about the young rock guitarist, Alfie Glass, who was in the semi-final and the Jimi Hendrix wannabee who didn't make it.

As I have already said, this is just my opinion and none I would wish to impose on anyone else - okay, I have just done that though without the intention to 'impose'. Music is an art form that I enjoy in it's many different expressions. I like some Mozart, though not all of it, and I like some heavy metal, though not most of what I have heard. I want to hear something that can rouse or soothe, inspire me or let me wallow in it. The most important part is to enjoy the music.

Congratulations to all three finalists for making this an enjoyable experience of discovering new talent. Going back to Kevin's original comment on the use of the word 'star' I looked up the word in my dictionary and this word can be substituted with 'celebrity'. It seems we have been having 'celebrities' foisted on us for too long who have no talent, no skill, and very little character, just the desire to be famous. Sadly, for much too long than Andy Warhol's stated 15 minutes.

I have enjoyed the series as an insight in to what may be guitar greats of the future, possibly. Though let us not forget that we have a true 'guitar star' who outshines all of those seen by a very long way in the shape and form of our host to this forum - and long may that continue.

Kind regards
Brad

kevin
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Re: Guitar Star

Postby kevin » Mon Aug 03, 2015 8:01 am

Hi Brad, some interesting insights most of which I agree with.
Your comments about whether would you enjoy listening to the players for any length of time is something I am very mindful of and the answer for me is also no.
Surely if you play in public your aim is to entertain those you are playing to, as you rightly point out something our host does admirably.
Kevin

Johnty8
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Re: Guitar Star

Postby Johnty8 » Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:26 pm

Hello,

May I modestly comment on your interesting thread about ' Guitar Stars '

I probably come to this subject differently to most on this admirable forum as I am not particularly drawn to the guitar. I was born in 1945 and of course experienced the music scene in the 60's which introduced changes to popular music which had a profound effect on the commercial and cultural direction of the music industry. The guitar led bands were clearly the driving force behind these changes, good or bad, and the legacy continues today.

I don't know anything of the technique required to play any instrument well but I do believe I understand clearly what makes an artist great. I have been blessed to have experienced, both on and off stage, some of the world's finest performing artists and they all, whatever their genre, have one element in common.

They all have the ability to communicate emotion, on an individual level, through their performance. This is a rare gift that cannot be learned or obtained through endless practice, it is simply just that ... a gift.

Sinatra, Aznavour, Davis, Garland, Holiday and others have all demonstrated this gift and whilst I know far less than yourselves about guitarists, I have experienced two in particular who can truly be called great.

Robben Ford and Gordon Giltrap reside in this company and they create, in their performances, the feeling that they are performing just for you.

There is a relentless dumbing down within the industry and a rush to volume, over quality.

The sadness is that millions of young people are not listening to quality artists because their input is controlled by media and saturated with material, that is less than the best.

As a musician told me recently ' occasionally people price up their ears at quality, but then the money men say ... it will not sell ' and the status quo is quickly restored.

I thank you for touching so well on this subject and may I wish you all ... happy listening.

John

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Re: Guitar Star

Postby GORDON » Mon Aug 03, 2015 8:39 pm

Johnty8 wrote:Hello,

May I modestly comment on your interesting thread about ' Guitar Stars '

I probably come to this subject differently to most on this admirable forum as I am not particularly drawn to the guitar. I was born in 1945 and of course experienced the music scene in the 60's which introduced changes to popular music which had a profound effect on the commercial and cultural direction of the music industry. The guitar led bands were clearly the driving force behind these changes, good or bad, and the legacy continues today.

I don't know anything of the technique required to play any instrument well but I do believe I understand clearly what makes an artist great. I have been blessed to have experienced, both on and off stage, some of the world's finest performing artists and they all, whatever their genre, have one element in common.

They all have the ability to communicate emotion, on an individual level, through their performance. This is a rare gift that cannot be learned or obtained through endless practice, it is simply just that ... a gift.

Sinatra, Aznavour, Davis, Garland, Holiday and others have all demonstrated this gift and whilst I know far less than yourselves about guitarists, I have experienced two in particular who can truly be called great.

Robben Ford and Gordon Giltrap reside in this company and they create, in their performances, the feeling that they are performing just for you.

There is a relentless dumbing down within the industry and a rush to volume, over quality.

The sadness is that millions of young people are not listening to quality artists because their input is controlled by media and saturated with material, that is less than the best.

As a musician told me recently ' occasionally people price up their ears at quality, but then the money men say ... it will not sell ' and the status quo is quickly restored.

I thank you for touching so well on this subject and may I wish you all ... happy listening.

John


THANKYOU so much for posting those words of wisdom sir.

I am "old school" and just love melody so I can relate 100% to what you say.

Be well.

G.

BRC
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Re: Guitar Star

Postby BRC » Tue Aug 04, 2015 11:40 am

John,

Guitar players have no exclusive right in commenting on guitar playing and the comments of non-players are just as valid, so of course you are perfectly entitled to comment.

Your comments, I suspect, are shared with most, if not all, that read this forum. What is good music for one may not be so for another. Gordon says he has 'never been moved by Mozart' yet I find some of Mozart very moving, and some very tedious. Probably my favourite piece by Mozart is 'Piano Concerto 21' and would love to hear Gordon adapt this for guitar in his style. That isn't a challenge - just a thought to float in the ether and, who knows.......

The only comment you make that I would not totally agree with is "This is a rare gift that cannot be learned or obtained through endless practice, it is simply just that ... a gift." I agree that there are gifted people who are able to express their musical performance better than others. However, there is no substitution for hard work in learning the craft of playing an instrument and even harder work to read musical notation even if that is not completely essential to being able to play - useful but not essential.

"The harder I work, the luckier I get" is an oft quoted saying, for which, unfortunately, I have not been able to find the true source, however substitute 'more gifted' for 'luckier' and I believe that is a fair summary for any 'gifted' musician. Some are naturally more able to play an instrument than others and others struggle but become talented musicians that can surpass those with the natural ability.

The first instrument I learned to play was the trumpet, and wasn't too bad. Sadly that stopped when I left school and now probably every trumpet player (except one of my neighbour's children) has gone well past me. I can still, if presented with such an instrument, produce the sound of a very distressed duck. Ah, but if I had continued the practice .... maybe I fool myself. Guitar playing didn't come easy to me and required a lot of work from Bert Weedon. That 'one day' from him took me a good few months to get anything that could be recognised as a tune. I would put myself as 'passable' but need a lot more hard work and practice these days.

The most important point is to enjoy the music whether as a player or listener. "There is a relentless dumbing down within the industry and a rush to volume, over quality." for me, hits the nail on the head. We don't have to join in the 'dumbing down', just keep alive the appreciation of the talented and honest performers.

I suppose I fall into the 'Old school' category, though try to keep an open mind as long as the sound pleases me.

Brad

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Re: Guitar Star

Postby Johnty8 » Tue Aug 04, 2015 1:49 pm

Thank you Brad for your kindness in responding to my earlier post.

I respect your remarks about the hard work required to learn the craft, any craft is essential to perfect a creative human endeavour and you are right to highlight that.

I stand completely by my belief that the gift I refer to cannot be learned or taught or acquired by endless practice, as craftmanship can.

If you will allow I will relate to you an incident that clarifies this better than my inadequate explanation.

Some years ago I met a guy who had been to Las Vegas in the 60's with his wife and children. He worked hard all year long driving trucks across America and saved hard for his recreation time with his family.

He fulfilled an ambition to see Sinatra live at The Sands and he told me about his experience.

I asked him one question .. 'what is your most significant memory of that concert?' to which he replied ...' he was singing to me, the guy was singing to me'

This was an honest guy who spent his working life in a tough business and he had tears in his eyes.

'Sinatra was singing to me'

That power to communicate can never be learned, it is a rare gift indeed.

I thank you once again Brad for replying to my post.

Best wishes
John

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Re: Guitar Star

Postby Stevo » Sun Jan 17, 2016 9:03 pm

The lad who won played an Eric Roche tune in the final and on stage at the end.
Good to hear music by the late great, Eric Roche being played.


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