Acoustic partial capo column

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DavidMillar
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Acoustic partial capo column

Postby DavidMillar » Wed Oct 09, 2013 12:32 am

This month's Acoustic magazine has a great article by Gordon on the partial capo and has spurred me to pass on a few interesting recent developments I have come across, to anyone interested in experimenting with these devices.

Presently there are many great capo manufactures and some of my own favourites include Shubb, Kyser and Planet Waves. The Kyser company have developed a new k-lever capo (available in Short Cut ie partial, Dropped D, Double dropped D, and Open G versions).

The best way to understand this concept is to have a look and listen:

The inventor explains-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BqqKFLPZgg

Phil Keaggy does a quick demo-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vdW92n-qDM

The standard capo is a wonderful little device and as soon as any of my beginning students can play a few chords I encourage them to immediately get one as they can easily access a huge range of music to start to play simple rhythm parts to - they quickly develop a love for playing and learning the instrument. A partial capo can be a very creative tool in the hands of a skilled artist and composer as Gordon has demonstrated in his column.
David Millar

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GORDON
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Re: Acoustic partial capo column

Postby GORDON » Wed Oct 09, 2013 10:28 am

DavidMillar wrote:This month's Acoustic magazine has a great article by Gordon on the partial capo and has spurred me to pass on a few interesting recent developments I have come across, to anyone interested in experimenting with these devices.

Presently there are many great capo manufactures and some of my own favourites include Shubb, Kyser and Planet Waves. The Kyser company have developed a new k-lever capo (available in Short Cut ie partial, Dropped D, Double dropped D, and Open G versions).

The best way to understand this concept is to have a look and listen:

The inventor explains-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BqqKFLPZgg

Phil Keaggy does a quick demo-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vdW92n-qDM

The standard capo is a wonderful little device and as soon as any of my beginning students can play a few chords I encourage them to immediately get one as they can easily access a huge range of music to start to play simple rhythm parts to - they quickly develop a love for playing and learning the instrument. A partial capo can be a very creative tool in the hands of a skilled artist and composer as Gordon has demonstrated in his column.


Hi David.

What readers of this FORUM should be aware of is this posting is by one of Irelands leading and most experienced guitar teachers.David it is always a joy to see you whenever I visit your part of the world ,which is sadly quite a rare occurrence.Thanks for your kind words my friend.

Be well.

G.

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Roger
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Re: Acoustic partial capo column

Postby Roger » Wed Oct 09, 2013 11:35 am

Can't wait to see the article on "Em's Tune" :D :D :D
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Jon G
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Re: Acoustic partial capo column

Postby Jon G » Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:06 pm

My friend (another Gordon) was using a partial capo he made himself in 1972. Is that a first?
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DavidMillar
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Re: Acoustic partial capo column

Postby DavidMillar » Sat Oct 26, 2013 11:36 pm

Jon,

There is some very detailed info on Wikipedia if you look up Partial Capo - "Guitarist Jerry Faires says that in 1967 a guy by the name of Carr came into his St. Louis area coffee shop sporting a Bill Russell capo with the two ends sawn off so the high and low E strings were open."

So your friend may not have been first, although the late 60s and early 70s certainly were a pioneering era for partial capos, however it is only fairly recently that good quality production models have become available. Interestingly the standard capo has been around for centuries.

The great thing about a partial capo over an altered tuning is that you easily play fretted notes and (bar) chords from standard tuning, and also use the drone like tones from open strings.

The K-lever is a great further development - I purchased 3 different models and particularly like the white open G one, although they also work well in multiple combinations.

Rgds,

David
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Bob Wilson
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Re: Acoustic partial capo column

Postby Bob Wilson » Sat Nov 23, 2013 5:29 pm

Hi all
You might also like to look at the third hand capo (if you can get one). Although it's a strap version it is a great version that gives you any conotation by a series of turning semi circles
Bob
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